An Exploration of the Artistic Applications of MEMS: Gallery on a Chip

By Kathryn Ecsedy, Ian Harvey, Alex Hogan, Kurtis Ford, Brian Baker, Paul Stout, Solomon Brumbaugh and Jacob Piatt.

Published by The Technology Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

This research explored the crossroads between art and science. Those involved on the project included individuals in the engineering and art fields. Powered by the micro charge-pumped actuation of electrons in a scanning electron microscope these artistic pieces use a phenomenon once considered an irritation as a power source. The pioneering application of artistic technique to micro-technology has inspired this “kinetic micro sculpture”. This new usage of microtechnology has led to mechanical invention, such as a 180 degree vertically rotating hinge and spontaneous out of plane motion.

Keywords: MEMS, Art, Kinetic Micro Sculpture, Charge Pumped-Actuation, SEM, Microscopy

The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp.139-152. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 1.354MB).

Kathryn Ecsedy

Scanning Electron Microscope Technician, Nanofabrication and Surface Science Laboratory, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Developer of Micromountains, The Grizzly, and Composition in Red, Yellow, and Blue as a freshman in Mechanical Engineering.

Dr. Ian Harvey

Associate Dorector, Nanofabrication and Surface Science Laboratory, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

Associate Director of nano and microfabrication as well as suface analysis at the University of Utah. Also teaches courses on such subjects as MEMS, where he mentored and directed the research for the artistic applications of MEMS along with many other more technical research projects.

Alex Hogan

Electrical Engineering student, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Developer of Crococritter as a sophomore in Electrical Engineering at the University of Utah

Kurtis Ford

Mechanical Engineering student, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Developer of The Blossom, Microcathedral, The Weeping Willow, and the Pinball Machine. Also assisted in the development of The Butterfly as a student of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah.

Brian Baker

Staff and Process Engineer, assistant professor, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Assistant Professor during the MEMS design course at the University of Utah, and superuser for the Sandia design process. Staff Process Engineer of the Nanofabrication laboratory for the University of Utah.

Paul Stout

College of Fine Arts professor, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Co-developed The Butterfly as a professor in the University of Utah’s Fine Arts Department.

Solomon Brumbaugh

Sculpture student, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Developer of The Snake Charmer while studying Sculpture at the University of Utah.

Jacob Piatt

Mechanical Engineering student, University of Utah, Utah, USA

Developed the Jacob’s Ladder as a student of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah.

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