We Don’t Dislike the Alarm: We Dislike Complying with the Alarm

By Stephen Rice, David Trafimow, Gayle Hunt and David Keller.

Published by The Technology Collection

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Article: Electronic $US5.00

Applied researchers are interested in understanding and predicting behaviors during disaster situations where alarms provide warnings of impending danger. The prior applied research indicates that responses to warning alarms are less than optimal. Prior research in social psychology has implicated attitudes as an important causal factor in behaviors. In the current study, we analyze whether attitudes towards the alarms, or attitudes towards complying with the alarms, has a stronger effect on participant compliance behavior. The data reveal that most people do not dislike the alarm itself; it is complying with the alarm that they dislike. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of these findings.

Keywords: Disaster, Warnings, Alarms, Attitudes

The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp.93-106. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Article: Electronic (PDF File; 795.091KB).

Dr. Stephen Rice

Assistant Professor, Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA

Dr. David Trafimow

Professor, Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA

Gayle Hunt

Graduate Student, Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA

Gayle Hunt is a graduate student at New Mexico State University. She received her B.A. from NMSU in 2009.

Dr. David Keller

Post-Doctoral Graduate, Psychology, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA


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